bringing it home title

Please help us raise £10,000 to save the lives of mothers and babies - you can help to stop them from dying needlessly. 



Why this story?

Sharmin and her daughter Halima

Seventeen-year-old Sharmin Akter from Ramkristopur, Bogra District, Bangladesh, has a seven- month old daughter, Halima. When she was pregnant, Sharmin regularly attended a Women and Children First women’s group run by our local partner in Bangladesh the Perinatal Care Project, where she learnt how to look after herself during pregnancy.

 “I believe that, without the support of the women’s group, Halima would have died. I think that all the women in the village should go to women’s group meetings, and hope that when Halima grows up, she, in turn will join the a Women and Children First group so she will be able to help the next generation of women.”

  

You can help mothers and babies from dying needlessly.

http://www.womenandchildrenfirst.org.uk/donate/donate-by-textregular donationone off donation

* £5 pays for a woman to attend one of our women's groups for a year

* £50 pays for the annual salary of a group facilitator to run a women's group for up to 30 women

* £500 could pay for us to train two community health workers to look after mother's and babies, like Sharmin and Halima, in rural Bangladesh

How we've been able to help Sharmin and other women in Bangladesh give birth safely - saving lives of mothers and babies 

womens group learning achievements

What's it like to give birth in Bangladesh where Sharmin lives?

Birth Matters in Bangladesh

Bringing it Home journey

One of our supporters, Sam Strickland, was so moved by his trip to Bangladesh to see our work in action that he has spent the last year making a film for us, for free.  

"What struck me most forcibly was how the conditions that women in Bangladesh die from aren’t any different to the conditions that women and babies in the UK can face during pregnancy and childbirth. The difference is where they live. And just because the numbers of women and babies that die in developing countries are so much higher than in the UK – the pain of loosing a baby, a wife, a mother, a friend, is no different."

Behind the scenes on the Bringing it Home set