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Celebrating the work of midwives

May 5 is the internationally recognised day for highlighting the work of midwives and Women and Children First is celebrating their successes and thanking them for their marvelous work.

Midwives have helped women deliver babies since the beginning of history and today they play a big role in ensuring women have a safe and healthy pregnancy as well as delivering babies. They carry out antenatal and postnatal care, help with breastfeeding, run family planning services, and provide vital support and advice along the way.

The theme of this year’s International Day of the Midwife is “The World Needs Midwives Today More than Ever.   Sadly the need is starkly real as midwives are in very short supply. There have been reports that more than half of Britain's maternity units are putting mothers and babies at risk because of a national shortage of midwives.  This is of great concern, but the statistics pale in contrast to the position in many developing countries. The World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends one skilled birth attendant for every 175 pregnant women, but countries like Rwanda have only 1 midwife per 8,600 births.   

Apart from being in short supply, midwives in many countries have to work without adequate equipment and medicines in inappropriate facilities, without the required professional support.  

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Midwives are Marvellous! Celebrating the International Day of the Midwife

May 5 is the internationally recognised day for highlighting the work of midwives and Women and Children First is celebrating their successes and thanking them for their marvelous work. Midwives have helped women deliver babies since the beginning of history and today they play a big role in ensuring women have a safe and healthy pregnancy as well as delivering babies. They carry out antenatal and postnatal care, help with breastfeeding, run family planning services, and provide vital support and advice along the way. The theme of this year’s International Day of the Midwife is “The World Needs Midwives Today More than Ever. Sadly the need is starkly real as midwives are in very short supply. There have been reports that more than half of Britain's maternity units are putting mothers and babies at risk because of a national shortage of midwives. This is of great concern, but the statistics pale in contrast to the position in many developing countries. The World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends one skilled birth attendant for every 175 pregnant women, but countries like Rwanda have only 1 midwife per 8,600 births. Apart from being in short supply, midwives in many countries have to work without adequate equipment and medicines in inappropriate facilities, without the required professional support. Women and Children First’s work in Malawi illustrates some of the challenges. Our projects encourage women to deliver in a health facility with a midwife rather than at home in unhygienic conditions with an untrained traditional birth attendant, but we know that increasing the numbers of women giving birth in a health facility can bring added difficulties. This is what a midwife at Nsiyaludzu Health Centre, one of the health centres covered by our work with the Perinatal Care Project in Malawi, had to say: “Currently I am working here alone at this maternity facility because my co-worker died in an accident. We may have up to 70 births a month. The area we serve is very large. The number of women giving birth is rising now that women have been educated and the traditional birth attendants have been stopped from doing deliveries in women’s homes.” ‘We work hand in hand with the Perinatal Care Project and have learnt a lot from it. We have been reminded where we have been making mistakes. We have also been reminded about all the things we need to do during check ups. A lot more women are now coming to the health centre since I first came here in 2004. We used to have only about 10 deliveries a month and now it is usually 50 something. Every quarter we meet with the community volunteers and chiefs who present issues from the community perspective regarding the way they were handled by the health centre etc. There has been a great change here now and there are many fewer complaints about the service which women receive here. We still have challenges one of which is the supply of drugs – sometimes we can’t get the things we need like drugs to prevent malaria and iron supplements which are important for pregnant women. Also some women don’t come for an antenatal visit until too late – when they are perhaps seven months pregnant. A few mothers therefore only manage to make few visits. But we have spoken with the chiefs to try to ensure that the women come early and manage four appointments. We also have a problem with our appointment room – men are now coming with their wives to attend appointments but the room we have doesn’t have room for them to all sit with the nurse. Also sometimes we call the community leadership but the messages they are given are sometimes misinterpreted when they get to the community. Finally we don’t really have enough space or equipment, for example we only have one set of scales which is not always enough.’ If you would like to contribute to improving midwifery care please support our work. undefined

More mothers and babies receive good care in Malawi

We are delighted that the Comic Relief funded project that we ran in the Ntcheu district of Malawi between 2010 and 2015 has proved highly effective in improving maternal, newborn and child health.

In collaboration with the Ministry of Health’s Perinatal Care Project, we ran 144 women’s groups that reached 80,000 people and improved the provision of healthcare in 14 health centres.

In the groups, women learnt how to keep themselves and their babies safe – and passed that information onto other women. Together they devised and delivered strategies which improved maternal and child health, such as creating drama groups to share health information, improving sanitation and village hygiene, establishing village savings and loans associations, developing kitchen gardens to improve nutrition and setting up bylaws to discourage early marriages.

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International Day for Maternal Rights - let's take action

International Maternal Health Day 2015

 

This year is only the second time that the International Day for Maternal Health and Rights (#IntlMHDay) has been celebrated.  We at Women and Children First are surprised that this is such a new initiative given that, even in 2015, a woman dies in pregnancy or childbirth every two minutes.

There is an urgent need to increase global action on maternal health and rights.  Reproductive rights are at the cornerstone of maternal health, but these rights are frequently abused in many different ways. Pregnancy, childbirth and HIV are the leading causes of death for girls and women of reproductive age and it is not just poverty or poor service provision that are to blame.  Women are frequently subjected to disrespect and abuse by health providers during pregnancy and childbirth and reproductive rights are often neglected by governments and policy makers. 

We are therefore joining with the maternal health community to call on governments, international institutions and other civil society organisations to recognise 11 April as the International Day of Maternal Health and Rights.  We call on everyone to take action to establish, promote and protect maternal health and rights and ensure a comprehensive, inclusive and rights based approach to maternal health and rights.

We are proud that Women and Children First’s programmes contribute to this aim.  Through our projects women become more aware of their rights and are empowered to demand improved care.  Working together in groups, women gain confidence to express their health needs and wishes with their family, their community, health care providers and local decision makers.  You can help them do this by making a donation to our work. Every £5 you give can improve a mother's chance of surviving pregnancy and childbirth.

Here's a fabulous way for you to support our work

Women and Children First gets £5 from the sale of every stylish and practical Storksak Noa Yellow baby changing bag bought online.

Emily Bradury from Storksak says “We share Women and Children First’s ambition to prevent mothers and babies from dying during pregnancy, childbirth or in the first few days and months of life.

At Storksak we know how lucky we are here in the Western world to have good quality health information - we have health visitors, doctors, nurses, family and friends to turn to for help when times get difficult. Imagine how terrifying life would be if you were living in poverty, lacking the basic information and knowledge to do the right things to keep yourself and your baby alive, safe and well.

“That is why we have chosen to donate to Women and Children First by giving a percentage of the sales of our new spring / summer 2015 Noa Yellow baby changing bag to support your work.”

£5 pays for one woman in a developing county to attend one of our women’s groups for a year where she can receive good quality health information and care from properly qualified professionals. Our work improves a mother’s chance of surviving pregnancy by up to 45%.

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